Types of Tables For Your Dining Room

dining table

Modern architecture, open living, and minimalist living influence our living style, which is constantly changing. It’s no longer only a rectangle wooden table with six seats that defines a dining table in today’s market; there are many tables for your dining room to choose from.

You may select a dining table in various shapes and sizes and terms of color, material, and price. Selecting the appropriate dining table is critical since it serves as the focal point of the dining room.

Types of Tables For Your Dining Room

Before choosing which dining table would be the most excellent fit for your needs, various considerations must be made. Below are some of them discussed in detail.

1. Dining Table Top Materials

First, you must decide what kind of tabletop material you want to utilize. It is common for interior designers to suggest that you experiment with various table materials to find the perfect one for your home.

So, durability will be an essential consideration in choosing the table. Listed below are the most common materials for dining room tables.

Wooden Dining Table

It’s impossible to go wrong with a tried and true classic! Wooden dining tables are elegant and long-lasting, and they may be passed down through generations if properly cared for. Tables made of solid wood are among the most popular options.

Walnut, mahogany, maple, oak, and teak are excellent possibilities. Pine is a fantastic option for people seeking a less-priced wood table.

Tables made of solid wood are more costly and sensitive to staining and scratching than tables made of laminate or veneer. To keep your wood table looking its best, you need to maintain it properly.

Wooden Dining Table
Wooden dining tables are elegant and long-lasting, and they may be passed down through generations if properly cared for.

Metal Dining table

As a result, metal dining tables look well in contemporary and traditional settings. These tables are simple to clean and can be used in various locations, making them a great option.

The hefty nature of metal tables might make them cumbersome to transport, although lighter metal tables are available. As a result, they might get heated to the touch if worn outside.

Glass

An illusion of openness is created by using glass tabletop surfaces in a space. If you’re looking for a piece of furniture that’s long-lasting, attractive, and subtle, this is the one for you.

For families with young children, glass tabletop surfaces may not be the best choice because of the ease with which fingerprints accumulate on them. Tabletops made of glass may have sharp edges, making them unsuitable for use by little children.

glass table
If you’re looking for a piece of furniture that’s long-lasting, attractive, and subtle, this is the one for you.

Dining Table Shapes

Depending on the size of your dining room and the number of guests you want to host, the form of your dining table may change.

Rectangular

A rectangle is the most common form of a dining table. Most dining rooms can fit six people comfortably around them, and there’s plenty of space for serving utensils in the middle.

Square

A square table may comfortably seat four people in a small dining room or apartment without taking up a lot of areas. It’s best to balance big dining rooms with hutches or sideboards that complement or contrast the rest of the decor.

Oval

An oval table may accommodate six people yet have a pleasing curvy appearance. Dining tables in the shape of an oval have a smaller serving area, but they are more straightforward.

Because there are no corners to get in the way, oval dining tables are an excellent option for smaller rectangular areas with a little less space

2. Dining Table Design

Meanwhile, we’ll take a deeper look at some of the most frequent tables for your dining room design.

Pedestal

One or more columns provide support for a pedestal table’s top. It is easy to get up and sit down at the table in a compact area since there are no legs to get in the way.

Single

Single pedestal tables are often but not always circular because of their simplicity. Tables supported by a single column, such as oval or rectangular tables, are at risk of tilting if someone leans on one of the corners. To prevent this, it is advised that no more than eight people be seated at a time at a single pedestal table.

Double

The simplicity of a pedestal table, but the capacity to accommodate more than eight people, may be ideal for you if you want double pedestal tables. The tabletop is supported by two thick columns instead of a single-center column.

double dining table
The simplicity of a pedestal table, but the capacity to accommodate more than eight people, may be ideal for you if you want double pedestal tables.

Trestle

Trestles, a bracing structure used to support these tables, are often found at either end of the table, one on each side. When keeping the tabletop, the horizontal beam is attached to the trestle.

Each trestle end is supported by a pair of legs that slope away from the center beam. Trestle tables are fashionable and attractive.

Ensure that you have enough legroom at both ends of the table before buying a trestle.

Leg tables

Leg tables with four legs are the most prevalent. The use of a three-legged table isn’t all that uncommon either.

A “table leg” is single vertical support. Leg tables provide a lot of space for people’s feet when they sit down. Corners are the most common location for them.

Expandable Dining Table

Having an extendable dining table will allow you to have frequent parties or family get-togethers at your house while simultaneously reducing the size of the table when your guests depart.

You may pull the center of an extensible dining table apart, and you can add additional parts known as ‘leaves.’

Bottom Line

Decent tables for your dining room will be solid and well-built, with a finish that can resist wear and tear. A well-built table relies heavily on its material, but it is only as good as its craftsmanship. The more solid the spots where the base and top fit together are known in the business as “joinery,” and the longer the table lasts, the better.

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Hello, I am Heather and I'm a journalist who writes mostly about interiors, but also about architecture in general. Recently I also became a big fan of gardening. My house has been featured in Living Etc, HeartHome and Corriere della Sera. I am sharing some of my tips here on Housenate.com, but you can find my articles also on Livinator or Housance.
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